Image Image Image Image Image

©2012 Scouts for Equality | Login | Field Reports

 

Scroll to Top

To Top

Anti-Bullying Resources

“On My Honor…”

We have all pledged to follow the Scout Oath and Law. These aren’t just words we had to memorize. As members and alumni of the Boy Scouts of America we have pledged to follow these principles.

There is nothing in the Scout Law that will allow us to participate in or tolerate bullying of any kind.

We all know what bullying is. We’ve seen it plenty of times. Physical abuse, pushing, shoving, threatening, the teasing that’s one sided or goes on too long, name calling, isolation, messing with other peoples stuff, stealing…

There is no excuse for bullying. The person being bullied, regardless of their popularity, personality, age, or level of maturity, is never at fault.

The National School Climate Survey conducted by GLSEN in 2011 reported these statistics on bullying:

  • 82% of LGBT youth had problems during the previous year with bullying about sexual orientation.
  • 64% felt unsafe at school due to sexual orientation.
  • 44% felt unsafe at school due to gender identification.
  • 32% did not go to school for at least one day because of feeling unsafe.

LGBT teenagers are two or three times more likely to attempt suicide than other teens (stopbullying.gov). If the family of the LGBT youth does not accept them, they are eight times more likely to commit suicide than other teens.

You can read more about these statistics on the websites of HRC and nobullying.com.
 

General Resources

Resources for Cub Scouts & Leaders

  • Story about Warm Fuzzies and Cold Pricklies (PDF)

    • Once there was a faraway land called “Life.” Now, in Life, whenever people are born, they are given a bag of Warm Fuzzies. For the rest of their lives, whenever they said “Hello” or said “Goodbye” or met a new person or greeted a friend, they would give each other a Warm Fuzzy. What is a Warm Fuzzy you may ask? Well…
  • Confessions of a Bully (YouTube video)

    • Cameron is a young boy who made the wrong choice to bully another child. He apologized but still felt bad for causing hurt and wanted to make it right. He’s asking you to share his video so that others might change their bullying ways as well.
  • Bars & Melody – British Kids Rap about Bullying (YouTube Video)

    • Two British boys perform a song/rap on “Britain’s Got Talent” about the harm of bullying.
  • “What You Do” Cartoon Network Video

    • A fun video by the Cartoon Network on what to do when you see bullying happening.
  • Sesame Street: Don’t Be a Bully

    • The monsters from Sesame Street teach their friend to play fair.
  • Sesame Street: Standing Up to a Bully

    • This Sesame Street animation, tells the story of a kid who is being left out and bullied on the playground, making him feel sad and lonely. His friend Kate, shows him the difference between tattling and reporting and he decides to tell his teacher what is happening.
  • Den Activity – Grades 1 & 2 (Tigers & Wolves)

    • Thirty minute activity designed to help kids recognize bullying behavior and learn strategies for dealing with it. Produced by the National Crime Prevention Council.
  • Den Activity – Grades 2 & 3 (Wolves & Bears)

    • Thirty minute activity designed to help kids recognize different types of bullying and practice communication and social skills. Produced by the National Crime Prevention Council.
  • No Name-Calling Week Elementary School (K-5) Lessons

    • In 2007, GLSEN collaborated with The National Association of Elementary School Principals to develop a series of lesson plans on name-calling, bullying and bias. Since that time, their collection of lessons has continued to grow. You’ll find the current collection here.
  • What to Teach Kids about Bullying

    • Facts and advice to help kids overcome bullying. Produced by the National Crime Prevention Council.
  • Caine Stands Up

    • A short video sharing Caine’s story – one of the powerful narratives filmed for The BULLY Project, the social action campaign inspired by the documentary film BULLY.
  • Scouts Canada – Meeting Program – Personal Safety

    • Resources and games that could be used to supplement a Den Meeting on personal safety and inclusion.

Resources for Boy Scouts & Leaders

Cyberbullying Resources

  • OnGuardOnline.gov – Cyberbullying

    • Explanation of cyberbullying and thoughts on what to do about it.
  • NetSmartz – Cyberbullying

    • Explanation of cyberbullying and thoughts on what to do about it.
  • Think Before you Type

    • Think Before You Type’s goal is to raise awareness about cyberbullying, promote positive self-esteem, and encourage other young people to use the internet for good.
  • National Crime Prevention Council – Cyberbullying

    • Information and resources to curb the growing problem of cyberbullying. Produce by the National Crime Prevention Council.
  • Cyberbullying Research Center

    • The Cyberbullying Research Center is dedicated to providing up-to-date information about the nature, extent, causes, and consequences of cyberbullying among adolescents. This web site serves as a clearinghouse of information concerning the ways adolescents use and misuse technology. It is intended to be a resource for parents, educators, law enforcement officers, counselors, and others who work with youth. Here you will find facts, figures, and detailed stories from those who have been directly impacted by online aggression. In addition, the site includes numerous resources to help you prevent and respond to cyberbullying incidents.
  • Cyber Chip – BSA Cyberbullying Resources

    • To help families and volunteers keep youth safe while online, the Boy Scouts of America introduces the Cyber Chip. In developing this exciting new tool, the BSA teamed up with content expert NetSmartz®, part of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children® and training expert for many law enforcement agencies. Topics include cyberbullying, cell phone use, texting, blogging, gaming, and identity theft.

Thanks to Wendell Baker and the SFE Golden Gate chapter for putting together this list of resources. For their more extensive list of resources and videos, see their directory.

 

For urgent concerns, including the possibility of self-harm, contact The Trevor Project’s crisis and suicide prevention hotline for immediate help:
1-866-4-U-Trevor or at www.thetrevorproject.org.